SEASON I

Program 01 15.10.05
Program 02 22.10.05
Program 03 29.10.05
Program 04 05.11.05
Program 05 12.11.05
Program 06 19.11.05
Program 07 26.11.05
Program 08 03.12.05
Program 09 10.12.05
Program 10 17.12.05
Program 11 25.12.05
Program 12 07.01.06
Program 13 14.01.06
Program 14 21.01.06
Program 15 28.01.06
Program 16 04.02.06
Program 17 11.02.06
Program 18 18.02.06
Program 19 25.02.06
Program 20 04.03.06
Program 21 11.03.06
Program 22 18.03.06
Program 23 25.03.06
Program 24 01.04.06
Program 25
08.04.06
Program 26 15.04.06
Program 27 22.04.06
Program 28 29.04.06


SEASON II

Program 01 14.10.06
Program 02 21.10.06
Program 03 28.11.06
Program 04 04.11.06
Program 05 11.11.06
Program 06 18.11.06
Program 07 25.11.06
Program 08 02.12.06
Program 09 09.12.06
Program 10 16.12.06
Program 11 23.12.06
Program 12 30.12.06
Program 13 06.01.07
Program 14 13.01.07
Program 15 20.01.07
Program 16 27.01.07
Program 17 03.02.07
Program 18 10.02.07
Program 19 17.02.07
Program 20 24.02.07
Program 21 03.03.07
Program 22 10.03.07
Program 23 17.03.07
Program 24 24.03.07
Program 25 31.03.07
Program 26 07.04.07
Program 27 14.04.07
Program 28 21.04.07
Program 29 28.04.07

Lydia Moyer
Nebraska Suite
2000, 8 min.
(video, b&w, sound)

 

Program 19 February 25, 2006

 

"American Myths"

Each of these three video works presents a myth developed in a uniquely American context. Tom Whitton's Untitled (exchange) transports the ubiquitous childhood mythology of the Tooth Fairy, who collects children's fallen teeth in exchange for money, to a contemporary suburban setting. Like most characters of this ilk (Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny), the parent enacts the role of the fantastical figure. In the video, the father goes to extreme lengths to recreate his character, even donning a costume. The work humorously comments upon the both the persistence of myth in contemporary society, as well as the absurdity of its existence. Linda Moyer's Nebraska Suite presents a contrived mythology: that of the female gunslinger in the Old West. Using new media, Moyer presents the same character as both man and woman, showing the problematics in translocating gender. Lisa Shenouda's Subarban Nightmare is a campy take on the common practices of a suburban homemaker. A generic female protagonist bakes a cake with a disastrous outcome that recalls the denoument of a horror film. Much like Whitton, Shenouda critiques a myth constructed for children, that of childbirth ex nihilo, in extremely humorous terms.

-Andrew Cappetta

Tom Whitton
Untitled (Exchange)
2005,  5:15 min.

Lydia Moyer
Nebraska Suite
2000, 8 min.

Lisa Shenouda & Thomas Johnson
Suburban Nightmare # 6
2005, 3 min.